Last edited by Kagajinn
Friday, July 17, 2020 | History

6 edition of Nietzsche On Gender found in the catalog.

Nietzsche On Gender

Beyond Man And Woman

by Frances Nesbitt Oppel

  • 249 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published by University of Virginia Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Modern Western philosophy, c 1600 to the present,
  • Women"s studies,
  • Philosophy,
  • Gender Studies,
  • Social Science,
  • Woman (Philosophy),
  • Sociology,
  • Sex,
  • Criticism,
  • History & Surveys - 19th Century,
  • Femininity (Philosophy),
  • 1844-1900,
  • Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm,

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages229
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL9847013M
    ISBN 100813923204
    ISBN 109780813923208

      - Friedrich Nietzsche, Human, All Too Human, #92 What comes to mind for you when you think about the concept of justice? It certainly seems true that, if we conceive of justice as a form of fairness (not many would dispute this), and fairness is only really achievable among those who are equally powerful, then justice as well is only achievable.   Nietzsche also argued that these types are inseparable from certain cultures due to language, institutions, codes and traditions. 'Today as always, men fall into two groups: slaves and free men. Whoever does not have two-thirds of his day for himself, is a slave, whatever he may be: a statesman, a businessman, an official, or a scholar.

    The young professor soon began work on his first book, The Birth of Tragedy, the outline of which he claimed was thought out in the midst of the battle of Worth (Nietzsche []: ). The text was denigrated or ignored in the academic mainstream, but was affirmed by others as a brilliant and novel interpretation of Greek culture. |a Nietzsche's No to woman: knocking down an ideal -- The "secret source": ancient Greek woman in Nietzsche's early notebooks -- The birth of tragedy and the feminine -- Yes, life is a woman: irony, metaphor, and "woman" in the gay science -- Zarathustra's whip: disciplining readers -- All things are enchained, entwined, in love.

      Thus, Nietzsche’s first book, The Birth of Tragedy () represents an attempt to interpret the cultural significance of Ancient Greek tragic art (e.g. the Oedipus plays of Sophocles). For the Nietzsche of The Birth of Tragedy, as for the later Nietzsche, Ancient Greek art represents one of the high points in the history of European culture. Engaging a range of controversies in the secondary literature, including debates over Nietzsche’s views of women (, fn. 16), Schotten rejects all but those advanced by F.N. Oppel in her book Nietzsche on Gender. Schotten also musters numerous textual citations from primary sources to substantiate her points, but she occasionally.


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Nietzsche On Gender by Frances Nesbitt Oppel Download PDF EPUB FB2

Although Nietzsche has been considered by some critics to be a misogynist for his treatment of woman, women, and the feminine, Frances Nesbitt Oppel offers a radical reinterpretation of the philosopher's ideas on sex, gender, and sexuality.

In Nietzsche on Gender: Beyond Man and Woman, she argues that a closer reading of Nietzsche's texts and rhetorical style (especially his use Cited by: 7. In Nietzsche on Gender: Beyond Man and Woman, she argues that a closer reading of Nietzsche's texts and rhetorical style (especially his use of metaphor and irony), as well as his letters and notes, shows that he was strategically and deliberately dismantling dualistic thinking in general, not only the logical hierarchies of Western thought (God/human, heaven/earth, mind/body, reason/emotion, /5.

Although Nietzsche has been considered by some critics to be a misogynist for his treatment of woman, women, and the feminine, Frances Nesbitt Oppel offers a radical reinterpretation of the philosopher's ideas on sex, gender, and sexuality.

In Nietzsche on Gender: Beyond Man and Woman, she argues that a closer reading of Nietzsche's texts and rhetorical style (especially his use of metaphor and irony), Author: Frances Nesbitt Oppel. Although Nietzsche has been considered by some critics to be a misogynist for his treatment of woman, women, and the feminine, Frances Nesbitt Oppel offers a radical reinterpretation of the.

Although Nietzsche has been considered by some critics to be a misogynist for his treatment of woman, women, and the feminine, Frances Nesbitt Oppel offers a radical reinterpretation of the philosopher's ideas on sex, gender, and sexuality.

In Nietzsche on Gender: Beyond Man and Woman, she argues that a closer reading of Nietzsche's texts and rhetorical style (especially his use of metaphor and irony).

ondary literature, Nietzsche's sources and notes, and details of Nietzsche's life. At the same time, my sense is that the space opened by Nietzsche's critique of gender ideals is more circumscribed than Oppel suggests, and that, as a result, he paradoxically offers more resources for.

In Nietzsche on Gender: Beyond Man and Woman, she argues that a closer reading of Nietzsche's texts and rhetorical style (especially his use of metaphor and irony), as well as his letters and notes, shows that he was strategically and deliberately dismantling dualistic thinking in general, not only the logical hierarchies of western thought (God/human, heaven/earth, mind/body, reason/emotion, Reviews: 1.

Nietzschean irony, her book does address the misappropriation of his ideas. On this count she is correct; my point is only that she needs to go beyond mere suggestion and make her point more explicit.

Understandably, to expect Nietzsche on Gender to answer all these questions is unrealistic. Articles Nietzsche’s Women in The Gay Science Linda Williams spots jewels within Nietzsche’s aphoristic archive of sexism.

At the beginning of Book Two of The Gay Science, Nietzsche presents a series of aphorisms on the end of this series, Walter Kaufmann writes in a footnote to his translation, “With this absurd aphorism the pages on women (sections ) reach their nadir.

Nietzsche wrote specifically about his views on women in Section VII of Human, All Too Human, which seems to hold women in high regard; but given some of his other comments, his overall attitude towards women is ambivalent.

Nietzsche on Gender Although Oppel shows us how to interrogate our beliefs about gender, sex, and religion, she fails to address in any serious way the misuse of Nietzsche. In Nietzsche on Gender: Beyond Man and Woman, she argues that a closer reading of Nietzsche's texts and rhetorical style (especially his use of metaphor and irony), as well as his letters and notes, shows that he was strategically and deliberately dismantling dualistic thinking in general, not only the logical hierarchies of Western thought (God/human, heaven/earth, mind/body, reason/emotion, /5(9).

This book offers a reinterpretation of Nietzsche's ideas on sex, gender, and sexuality. Nietzsche on Gender: Beyond Man and Woman argues that a closer reading of his texts, letters and notes shows that he was deliberately dismantling dualistic thinking in general.

Philosophy and Truth: Selections from Nietzsche's Notebooks of the Early s, ed. and trans. Daniel Breazeale, Prometheus Books,ISBN ; Philosophy in the Tragic Age of the Greeks, trans. Marianne Cowan, Regnery Publishing,ISBN Books Nietzsche and the Feminists John Mann reviews Nietzsche, Feminism and Political Theory, edited by Paul Patton.

The horrifying collision between Nietzsche and feminism contained within these pages is the philosophical equivalent of a nuclear reactor. A collision which perhaps the contributors hope will produce a raw, dangerous energy.

Let’s start with the Safranski book, Nietzsche: A Philosophical are absolutely loads of biographies of Nietzsche. Why did you go with this one in particular. I think the virtue of this book is that it has a detailed and readable narrative of the life, but it combines it with an introduction to the philosophical works, which is written at a very appropriate level for the beginner.

This book is actually, in fact, a compilation of some of Nietzsche's works that has been stripped out of its original source.

If one wants to get the full flow of Nietzsche's thought and progression in one work, pick up the books that this book took the material from and read them in procession; namely, Ecce Homo and Twilight of the Idols/5().

One book that is popular to help understand Nietzsche is Walter Kaufmann's Nietzsche: Philosopher, Psychologist, Antichrist.

It usually comes up on this subreddit when people look for secondary texts on Nietzsche. One dis-recommendation I would make is Nietzsche: A Very Short Introduction by Michael Tanner.

The Oxford University Press "A Very. Search Tips. Phrase Searching You can use double quotes to search for a series of words in a particular order. For example, "World war II" (with quotes) will give more precise results than World war II (without quotes).

Wildcard Searching If you want to search for multiple variations of a word, you can substitute a special symbol (called a "wildcard") for one or more letters.

Nietzsche’s book, “Human, All Too Human,” his inaugural assault on Wagner and Romantic metaphysics, hammers away at the word Mitleid, considering it an. Nietzsche was gravely concerned with ensuring the world would remain fertile for the growth of true human excellence. Thus he wrote for the higher man alone; urging him to overcome the temptations of herd morality and instead to proceed on his own heroic life-path, and in doing so provide inspiration for future generations of potential higher men.

Nietzsche was always very sparing in what he published, but he loved playing around with book titles. He wrote many more titles than books. One he scrapped was The Will to Power.Diprose develops an ontology of corporeal generosity in the first part of the book, primarily through the negotiation between Nietzsche and Merleau-Ponty's philosophies.

She begins with Nietzsche's analysis of generosity as both the model of self-production and an alternative to the creditor/debtor relations and mnemotechnics of pain they imply.